The Medusa Project is an initiative to reclaim Medusa - the mythical Greek woman whose gaze could turn anyone to stone - as a symbol of female empowerment.

The Medusa Project is an initiative to reclaim Medusa as a symbol of female strength and to stop misogynistic appropriations of the medusa myth and image.

Medusa is the mythical Greek woman who survived being sexually assaulted and cursed only to be murdered in her sleep. However, because men have been the primary retellers of the Medusa story over centuries, patriarchal interpretations featuring their biases about women and power have become the norm.

Founded in 2021, The Medusa Project has three goals:

To reclaim Medusa as a symbol of female strength

To stop misogynistic appropriations of the Medusa myth and image

To support the advancement of women

THE MEDUSA PROJECT IS MAKING AN IMPACT.

To date, we have worked with the CEOs of Redbubble and Zazzle to remove from sale on their platforms all 100+ products featuring the misogynistic image of Donald Trump as Perseus holding the severed head of Hillary Clinton as Medusa. We have also worked with major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, to amend biased descriptions of Medusa art. Said one museum director, “Much good will come of this.” Please email us at hello@themedusaproject.com to get involved or to let us know if you have seen a misogynistic reference to Medusa so we can take action.

“Thank you for the change you have already made through The Medusa Project.” – Hillary Rodham Clinton

Mishandling the Myth of Medusa

by Tyler A. Donohue

Rethinking Medusa

by Patricia Yaker Ekall

The Timeless Myth of Medusa

By Christobel Hastings

What Depictions of Medusa Say about the Way Society Views Powerful Women

by Abigail Cain

Gaze of the Medusa: The Defeat of Hillary Clinton

By Victoria Clebanov and Bennett Kravitz

Dangerous Beauty in the Ancient World and the Age of #MeToo

by Sumi Hansen

Medusa: How We Made a Rape Victim Into a Monster

by TillyC

Snake Eyes: The Power to Turn the Patriarchy into Stone

by McKenzie Schwark

The Face of Our Own Rage

by Gabby Tuzzeo

The Face of Our Own Rage

by Gabby Tuzzeo

Mishandling the Myth of Medusa

By Tyler A. Donohue

Medusa: How We Made a Rape Victim Into a Monster

by TillyC

below is a selection of resources relevant to The Medusa Project that you may wish to explore.

Women & Power

by Mary Beard

Gaze of the Medusa: The Defeat of Hillary Clinton

By Victoria Clebanov and Bennett Kravitz

The Original ‘Nasty Woman’

by Elizabeth Johnston

The Timeless Myth of Medusa

by Christobel Hastings

What Depictions of Medusa Say about the Way Society Views Powerful Women

by Abigail Cain

The Face of Our Own Rage

by Gabby Tuzzeo

Medusa: How We Made a Rape Victim Into a Monster

by TillyC

Snake Eyes: The Power to Turn the Patriarchy into Stone

by McKenzie Schwark

Dangerous Beauty in the Ancient World and the Age of #MeToo

by Sumi Hansen

Rethinking Medusa

by Patricia Yaker Ekall

Mishandling the Myth of Medusa

by Tyler A. Donohue

Pandora’s Jar

by Natalie Haynes

Women and Other Monsters

by Jess Zimmerman

Why So Many Mythological Monsters Are Female

by Nora McGreevy

  • Devin McDonald

    Founder, The Medusa Project

    Devin McDonald is a senior in the Classical Honors Program at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, and the 2022 recipient of the school’s Dickey Prize for Excellence in Greek. Passionate about the Classics and gender equity, Devin has devoted much of her time outside of classes to researching the connections between the way women are portrayed in classical myths and modern-day gender issues and advocating for vital changes. “Symbols matter in society,” says Devin. “I plan to do all I can to reclaim, protect, and advance the image of Medusa as a powerful, unifying, and inspiring symbol of female strength.”

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